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Hi.

Thanks so much for stopping by to read my words. I hope you find something enjoyable here. 

Updates and How to Make Ghee At Home!

Updates and How to Make Ghee At Home!

Hola, my friends! Long time, no post. I want to apologize for that. Things have been a bit cray recently but I'm here and I'm ready to talk about all things food, health, and butter! Just a few quick updates and reasons as to why I've been absent lately. School has started back and if you didn't know, I'm a teacher! Getting to know 39 third graders--their likes, dislikes, ways they learn best, their funniest jokes--takes up quite a bit of my time. 

My rad teaching partner, Kirsty and I. Gearing up for Meet the Teacher.

My rad teaching partner, Kirsty and I. Gearing up for Meet the Teacher.

I'm also the Matron of Honor in my best friend Kelley's upcoming wedding so I've been planning her Bachelorette weekend and shower and that has taken up some time as well. I'm super excited to celebrate my BFF Kel at her Bach in 1.5 weeks! 

Y'all, it is very evident that I need to vary up my wardrobe (insert violent eye-roll here).

Y'all, it is very evident that I need to vary up my wardrobe (insert violent eye-roll here).

We've also experienced a few gorgeous sunsets, a rainy solar eclipse, frequent trips to our fave taco truck (El Alteno), our backyard chickens finally laying, and Hurricane Irma(gerd). All in all, we've been busy. BUT alas, here I am coming at you with another way to brighten up your day and make your tummy feel good and it involves butter. Enjoy!

How to Make Your Own Ghee:

Let's get the elephant in the room out of the way first. What the heck is GHEE? Ghee is a type of clarified butter that you're left with after removing the milk solids and water from butter. 

On to the next elephant (this elephant is slightly larger than the last.) Why would I waste my time making ghee when I can just use regular butter or olive oil? WELL, ghee has a much higher smoke point than other oils and can be used to cook at a higher temperature. It also does not spoil easily and can be kept at room temperature for months at a time! The biggest of all: if you love butter like I do, but have issues with dairy, look no further, ghee to the rescue! Ghee is also a wonderful source of healthy fat! 

Now, that we've tackled both of those elephants, let's keep moving. 

Making my own homemade ghee is something I started doing back when I did my first round of Whole30. Everyone in the Whole30 community was talking about how easy it was to make so I tried it out myself. The first few times were pretty messy. I couldn't figure out when to take it off the burner and ended up with a buttery mess. But after a few tries, I was a pro. I make a fresh batch of ghee once every two to three weeks and leave it out on my counter. I literally cook everything in ghee: eggs, veggies, meat, you name it, I cook it in ghee. I love the rich, nutty flavor it gives to dishes and I don't miss my beloved butter at all. If you're interested in making your own ghee, check the recipe below. If you don't get it right the first time, keep trying. I promise you'll get it!

Ghee Recipe:

Things you'll need:

  • 2 packets Grass-fed unsalted or salted butter (I use the Kerrygold brand)
  • Medium sauce pot
  • Bowl (I use a 4 cup measuring glass cup. It just works with my straining set up!)
  • Strainer and a cheese cloth or coffee filter
  • Mason jar with a lid
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Instructions:

  1. Unwrap butter and place in your medium sauce pot.
  2. Place the pot on the stove at medium-high heat.
  3. Melt the butter until it begins to get foamy. (about 5 minutes)
  4. You will then begin to see some separation. Some of the milk solids will sink to the bottom of the pot and some will float to the top. 
  5. Continue to cook the melted butter until it turns a deep yellowish/orange color. (about 3-5 mintues)
  6. Once the milk solids have separated and you're left with a deep yellowish/orange liquid, carefully pour the melted ghee into the strainer/cheese cloth or coffee filter. *See how I've set up my strainer below! Make sure you're removing the browned milk solids. 
  7. Once you've strained out the bubbles and the milk solids, carefully transfer your ghee to your mason jar with a lid. 
  8. You've made your first batch of ghee! Now, go cook everything in GHEE!
Starting to get foamy!

Starting to get foamy!

Milk solids are starting to separate from the ghee. Some on the bottom and some on the top! At this stage I allow the ghee to continue to cook for a for about 3-5 more minutes.

Milk solids are starting to separate from the ghee. Some on the bottom and some on the top! At this stage I allow the ghee to continue to cook for a for about 3-5 more minutes.

My straining contraption! Check out that liquid gold! You can also see the milk solids in the coffee filter.

My straining contraption! Check out that liquid gold! You can also see the milk solids in the coffee filter.

This recipe yields approximately 14-16 oz. 

I hope you've enjoyed this post! Do you already use ghee at home? Let me know what you think in the comments below! 

With love,

Emily

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